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Climate Change Adaptation Plan – Port Elgin, NB

Prepared by EOS Eco-Energy
Endorsed by Port Elgin Council on
February 8, 2016
Climate Change
Adaptation Plan
Port Elgin, New Brunswick
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Cover photo credit: Anne Goodwin, Port Elgin
February 2016
EOS Eco-Energy
P.O. Box 6001
131D Main Street
Sackville, NB E4L 1G6
www.eosecoenergy.com
This project was funded by:
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Disclaimer
The contents of this document are provided for informational purposes only. This
plan is for the use of the Municipal Government of Port Elgin, NB. The
Municipality shall not be liable for any loss or damage, direct or indirect, which
may arise or occur as a result of the use of or reliance upon any of the material
contained in this plan.
Climate Change Adaptation Committee
Val MacDermid Councillor Village of Port Elgin
Terry Murphy Emergency Measures Org. Village of Port Elgin
Amanda Marlin Executive Director EOS Eco-Energy Inc.
Toni Roberts Local Resident Port Elgin
Tracey Wade Planner Southeast Regional
Service Commission
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Contents
Disclaimer ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3
Climate Change Adaptation Committee……………………………………………………… 3
Contents ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4
Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5
What is Climate Change?………………………………………………………………………. 6
What is Climate Change Adaptation?……………………………………………………… 6
Our Community……………………………………………………………………………………. 7
Methodology…………………………………………………………………………………………… 7
Planning Committee……………………………………………………………………………… 7
Public Engagement ………………………………………………………………………………. 8
Adaptation Vision…………………………………………………………………………………….. 8
Climate Change Impacts ………………………………………………………………………….. 9
Sea Level Rise……………………………………………………………………………………… 9
Intensifying Storms and Storm Surges ……………………………………………………. 9
Erosion ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 10
Changing Precipitation Patterns …………………………………………………………… 11
Flood Scenarios…………………………………………………………………………………….. 11
Risk and Vulnerability Assessments …………………………………………………………. 13
Priority Areas ………………………………………………………………………………………… 20
Community-Based Adaptation Plan …………………………………………………………. 20
Sewage Lagoon …………………………………………………………………………………. 20
Downtown Area………………………………………………………………………………….. 22
Fire Station………………………………………………………………………………………… 23
Erosion along Gaspereau River’s edge………………………………………………….. 23
Magee House…………………………………………………………………………………….. 25
Station Street Area……………………………………………………………………………… 25
Winter Storms ……………………………………………………………………………………. 26
Freshwater Flooding …………………………………………………………………………… 27
Public Education ………………………………………………………………………………… 28
Summary of Recommended Actions………………………………………………………… 29
Implementation and Monitoring……………………………………………………………….. 30
Glossary……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 31
Appendix – Public Engagement Materials…………………………………………………. 33
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Introduction
Port Elgin, New Brunswick, located on the Northumberland Strait, is one of the
most vulnerable regions in the province to climate change impacts, in particular
coastal flooding and erosion. A number of intense storms and storm surges
have impacted the community in recent years. Most notably, in 2010 one major
storm surge hit the Village, causing extensive damage estimated to be about
$700,000. During winter 2015 many houses were without power for an extended
time due to a powerful snowstorm.
Due to these well-known vulnerabilities, the Village of Port Elgin has taken a
series of actions to adapt to climate-related changes including planting rain
gardens in partnership with EOS Eco-Energy, developing an excellent
emergency measures plan, and conducting an inventory of homes with wood
heat (for use during winter power outages), etc.
Furthermore, the Village of Port Elgin completed its sustainability plan, Picture
Port Elgin in 2011, and is taking action to mitigate the effects of climate change
by being part of the Partners for Climate Protection (PCP) program, which
involves a 5-step process to reduce emissions at the local level.
The next step was to formalize the community’s various adaptation actions into
a community-based climate change adaptation plan. EOS Eco-Energy
coordinated the planning process and obtained funding from the New
Brunswick Environmental Trust Fund. The following community-based
adaptation plan includes information on climate change adaptation, local
impacts, flood scenarios, a summary of previous risk and vulnerability
assessments, and the adaptation plan organized by priority area.
Map of the Tantramar Region, including Port Elgin,NB. Source: J. Bornemann
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What is Climate Change?
Climate is the average weather pattern over many years while weather is shortterm.
Climate dictates what parts of the planet tend to be warmer, colder,
wetter, drier, and how often we see extreme weather events such a hurricanes.
Global temperatures are rising which will lead to more severe climate changes in
the future.
The greenhouse effect. Source: NB Department of Environment and Local Government
What is Climate Change Adaptation?
Climate change adaptation describes how we adjust to future climate
conditions. Adaptation involves making adjustments in our decisions, activities,
and thinking, because of projected changes in climate. Making these
adjustments will help decrease the negative effects of the changing climate, and
allow us to take advantage of any new and favourable opportunities.
Examples of adaptation measures can include:
• Choosing not to build houses in flood plains.
• Having a storm emergency kit and evacuation plan.
• Relocating houses from at-risk areas over time.
• Maintaining natural buffers to floods (wetlands, stream vegetation).
• Adjusting storm water and sewage infrastructure either by moving them,
or by increasing their capacity.
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• Reducing run-off and the burden on storm water infrastructure by
increasing permeable pavements, and increasing tree and vegetation
covers.
• Growing new foods better suited to a hotter climate.
In contrast to adaptation there can also be maladaptation. Maladaptation is
more harmful than helpful. An example includes sporadic placement of shoreline
stabilizers. While these adaptation measures may help protect an individual lot
owner, overall maladaptation measures actually increase a community’s
vulnerability to climate change and often result in increased economic costs.
Our Community
The Village of Port Elgin, New Brunswick is located at the mouth of Gaspereaux
River along the Northumberland Strait and is known for its, lumber,
manufacturing, and fishing history, rich natural diversity and saltwater marshes.
The community lies near the New Brunswick/Nova Scotia border, 70km from the
City of Moncton, NB. It has an aging population of 418 spread across roughly
18.55km2. This small coastal community has a kindergarten to grade 8 school,
health centre, churches, a small wharf, museum, fair grounds, seniors housing
complexes, fire station, community parks, and a few small restaurants and
storefronts. It is also home to Atlantic Windows, a window manufacturer, and
PEDVAC (Port Elgin District Volunteer Action Council).
Main Street Port Elgin. Photo: www.villageofportelgin.com
Methodology
Planning Committee
A planning committee was formed which includes representatives from EOS
Eco-Energy, the Southeast Regional Service Commission, the Village’s
Emergency Measures Organization (EMO), a village councillor and the local
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community. The committee met six times to discuss local climate change
impacts and flood scenarios, to review existing risk and vulnerability
assessments, to prioritize vulnerabilities; and develop adaptation options for an
action plan. The committee also organized two public engagement sessions and
other activities such as an information booth and brochures.
Public Engagement
Public engagement was an important part of the planning process. Information
was provided via newspaper articles (see Appendices), Facebook, and
workshops. A pamphlet about climate change impacts and adaptation (see
Appendices) was also developed and handed out door to door by Port Elgin’s
EMO coordinator. Copies of the pamphlet were also sent home with students at
Port Elgin Regional Elementary School. Input and feedback was sought through
workshops over the last few years. EOS Eco-Energy staff also welcomed
comments via Facebook, emails, telephone calls and at information booths,
such as at the Port Elgin Christmas Craft Fair in November 2015. Finally the
public was invited to participate in the vulnerability mapping exercise at Pedvac
on November 10, 2015.
Public vulnerability mapping session, November 2015. Photo: Amanda Marlin
Adaptation Vision
“Port Elgin, New Brunswick is a community resilient to climate impacts.”
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Climate Change Impacts
Sea Level Rise
The ocean has been rising over the past 100 years. For example, in Saint John,
the sea level has risen by 24 cm since 1920. It is now predicted to rise
approximately 1 metre between 2010 and 2100 around New Brunswick. Sea
level rise is partly due to natural sinking of the land. Melting of the ice caps and
glaciers, as well as the expansion of seawater due to heating, adds to a higher
and faster rise in sea levels.
The sea is rising around New Brunswick. Source: Lieske and Bornemann, 2012
Intensifying Storms and Storm Surges
In the last decade there have been several serious storm events in the region.
Storm surges often accompany these events and can cause considerable
damage. During the past few years, major storm surges have hit many
communities in New Brunswick including one that hit Port Elgin in 2010 with
extensive damage estimated to be around $700,000.
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Storms are increasing in frequency and intensity. Source: Lieske and Bornemann, 2012.
Erosion
Coastal erosion is increasing in severity around the province. The Northeast
region is experiencing the highest erosion rates, followed by the
Northumberland Strait, Chaleur Bay, and then the Fundy Coast. Port Elgin and
the Northumberland Strait are no exception. Erosion can be mapped through
aerial photographs, but sometimes it is also quite apparent to the naked eye in
various places around the community, such as by the Main St. lift station in the
photo below.
Erosion on the bank of the Gaspereau River below Main St. lift station. Photo: Anne Goodwin.
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Changing Precipitation Patterns
More rain and snow are falling, but less often and in more severe events. An
extreme rainfall event occurs when 50 mm or more rain falls over a 24-hour
period. In recent years, many of these extreme precipitation events have cost
millions of dollars in flooding damage to many communities in New Brunswick.
Extreme snowstorms have closed major highways and left residents without
power for a number of days.
Flood Scenarios
Flood scenarios are based on projected sea levels and storm events that may
impact a given area. They are generally outlined in “likelihood” of the event
occurring. For example, a 1 in 10 year storm event is likely to happen once
every 10 years, or each year there is a 10% chance of it happening. A 1 in 100
(1:100) year storm event is a major event only projected to happen once in a
century, or a 1% chance of happening every year. Flood scenarios are
developed through scientific analysis by trained climatologists. Sea level flood
scenarios we are using for Port Elgin are:
A current 1:25 storm
This storm was experienced by residents in 2010.
A 1:100 storm in the year 2100
This is the projected “worst-case scenario” storm that could be experienced in
that time period, based on scientific projections. The map below shows the
possible flood extent (how far the water will reach) during each of these
scenarios, and therefore which properties and buildings are most vulnerable to
flood damage.
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Current 1:25 Storm
Source: Cullen Mulroy, 2015 with Lidar data from 2011
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1:100 Storm in 2100
Source: Cullen Mulroy, 2015 with Lidar data from 2011
Risk and Vulnerability Assessments
Climate change is and will continue to impact economic, social and
environmental assets in Port Elgin. A number of initiatives, with public input,
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have taken place over the last few years to assess local risks and vulnerabilities
within municipal boundaries. These are summarized on the next pages.
Port Elgin Coastal Workshops 2010-2011
Three coastal issues workshops were organized in Port Elgin by the Tantramar
Planning District Commission (now the Southeast Regional Service Commission)
from April 2010 to February 2011. These workshops took place around three
damaging storm surges in the region (in January, October and December 2010).
The first workshop involved guest speaker Gary Lines, a senior climatologist
with Environment Canada, who spoke to local residents about the latest climate
science including predictions for temperature, sea level rise and severe weather
events. The second workshop featured Amanda Dean from the Insurance
Bureau of Canada and Laurie Colette from the NB Department of Environment
who spoke about policies and regulations related to coastline damage.
The third workshop focused on a community vulnerability assessment of Port
Elgin to coastal challenges. Participants were asked to identify key coastal
issues in Port Elgin and they used maps to identify key locations of impact. In
addition, they assessed facilities (lagoon, three lifts stations, nursing home,
school, fire department, village office, Main St. business district, wharf, hiking
trails and the walking bridge) and the impacts they face from coastal issues as
well as if they require repairs or upgrades. Cribwork was also noted to have
eroded. A social assessment was also performed. It was concluded that those
most affected by coastal issues are people in isolated areas of the town,
seasonal cottages along the coast with access roads that are prone to flooding,
and several homes in low-lying areas of Port Elgin. The main concerns are being
cut off from transportation routes during storms and floods, and being able to
receive financial aid for damaged property. In addition, social impacts include
impacts to heritage resources such as Fort Gaspereau, human health impacts
from a flooded sewage lagoon, as well as general stress and fear. Economic
impacts may be felt if local businesses or industries sustain flood damage. The
Main St. business district is susceptible to coastal flooding. Finally
environmental issues were also discussed and the main issue was damage to
the coast line from storm surge events, flooding of the lagoon and boil water
orders. Participants felt these would happen more often in the future.
The priorities resulting from these sessions included:
• Storm surges
• Heavy rain
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• Location of the lagoon
• Erosion
The adaptation options suggested from these sessions included:
• More government financial assistance
• Rezone and restrict building in certain areas identified as highly vulnerable
• Create regulations around building in sensitive areas
• Good baseline data and better monitoring of tide levels is needed
• Up to date digital elevation models are needed
• Sea level rise scenarios need to be run on digital models
• A radio communication system is needed in the region for EMO
• Expand municipal boundaries
• Address issue of the lagoon and its location on the edge of the river
November 2014 Preparing for Flooding in Tantramar Workshop
A public workshop was organized by EOS Eco-Energy and the Tantramar
Climate Change Adaptation Collaborative (the Village of Port Elgin EMO is a
member of the Collaborative) in November 2014 at the Marshlands Inn with
funding from the New Brunswick Environmental Trust Fund. Eighty people were
in attendance.
November 2014 workshop. Photo: Amanda Marlin
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The workshop provided the public with information on the current state of the
dykes, flood scenarios, and how to prepare for emergencies at home. The
session concluded with a tour of the dykes. Some ideas suggested by
participants at the session included:
• Have more events like this one and that more of the public need to hear the
messages provided.
• Participants wanted to hear more details, more information about how to
prepare, more on rescue methods, more on what community EMOs are
planning.
• Some participants wanted to see sessions designed specifically for their
neighborhoods and streets.
• Others wanted to see more federal government involvement and key
decision makers.
• And others wanted to know why construction of new buildings is still allowed
in flood plains.
• Have a bulk purchase of sump pumps and backflow valves.
• Weekly preparedness tips in the local paper.
June 2015 ACASA Coastal Adaptation Guidance Workshop
Port Elgin Village councillors, staff, EOS Eco-Energy, Southeast Regional
Service Commission, NB Department of Environment and local residents met
with researchers from ACASA (Atlantic Canada Adaptation Solutions
Association) who were developing an on-line decision tree for small rural coastal
communities in Atlantic Canada. The tool is designed to help communities
identify different land use and engineering options to address coastal sea level
rise and erosion issues. The workshop participants decided to focus on the
issue of community-wide flooding and use the decision tool to come up with
adaptation options. Participants also noted that there is a somewhat urgent (5-
10 year) need for adapting to community-wide flooding. The results of this
session included both land use plans and engineering adaptation options
(ranked according to appropriateness):
Land Use Planning Adaptation Options (see definitions in Glossary)
1. Emergency preparedness (Port Elgin has an EMO plan)
2. Integrated community sustainability plan (Port Elgin has one already)
3. Green shoreline rating system
4. Management retreat/abandonment
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5. Setbacks (included in Port Elgin’s zoning by-law, but may need to be
increased)
6. Abandonment
7. Land use bylaws or regulations (Port Elgin has a zoning by-law)
8. Development agreements
9. Statutory community plan (Port Elgin has a Municipal Plan)
Engineering Adaptation Options
1. Dyke
2. Living shoreline/wetlands
3. Relocate infrastructure
4. Rain gardens/constructed wetlands
5. Storm water management
6. Raised infrastructure
7. Wet flood proofing buildings
8. Dry flood proofing buildings
9. Drainage ditches
ACASA Workshop in Port Elgin, June 2015. Photo: Amanda Marlin
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November 2015 Community Adaptation Viewer Workshop
Taking all of this information into account, a public session to identify
community vulnerability was held in November 2015. Organized by the
Adaptation community, the session was facilitated by Mount Allison University
student Cullen Mulroy and his supervisor Dr. David Lieske The workshop took
place at Pedvac with 10 people in attendance. Pizza and refreshments were
served and participants began the evening by watching Ian Mauro’s video
“Climate Change in Atlantic Canada”. Participants were then shown two sea
level rise flood scenarios – a current 1:25 storm (as was experienced in 2010)
and a 1:100 storm in the year 2100. At these flood levels participants could see
what community assets would be affected and were asked to locate these on
the GIS-based digital map. Information about each point was also entered to
create an interactive map for future use. During the session, areas of erosion
were identified, areas prone to coastal flooding were pinpointed, the lagoon was
mentioned, and locations with vulnerable populations were also recorded.
Finally, results from the 2011 vulnerability assessment by the Tantramar
Planning District Commission, as well as entries in the Picture Port Elgin
sustainability plan were included in the map for a complete vulnerability
assessment of the village. The Picture Port Elgin sustainability plan included
related items such as:
• Develop a new hydrographic map and flood plain level
• Conduct a vulnerability assessment of buildings within floodplain
• Develop policies and regulations regarding development within floodplain
• Assess municipal lagoon for stability and adaptation options
• Increase the proportion of porous surfaces
• Encourage low impact developments such as rain gardens
• Assess culverts for capacity and flow
• Encourage landowners to remove cross-connections between storm and
sanitary lines, and disconnect sump pumps and foundations drains from
sewage systems
• Create new wetlands to accommodate storm water run off
• Begin research on expanding village boundaries to allow for a community
retreat from coastal threats
All areas of concern were recorded on the GIS-based digital vulnerability map
(see the next page).
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Port Elgin Climate Change Vulnerability Map
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Priority Areas
Taking into consideration results from the workshops, public input, and the
Picture Port Elgin plan, the committee selected the following priority areas for
the community-based climate change adaptation plan:
1. Sewage lagoon
2. Flooding of downtown area
3. Fire Station
4. Erosion
5. Magee House
6. Station Street area
7. Winter storms
8. Public education
9. Freshwater and culverts
Each of these priority areas are addressed further below with a series of action
plans to address their vulnerabilities and reduce the associated risks.
Community-Based Adaptation Plan
Disclaimer: It is recommended that an engineer review the recommendations
presented below to determine if they are feasible and to provide cost estimates.
Sewage Lagoon
Goal: Increased public health and safety, a cleaner river.
Activity: Build up the berm
Description Increase the height of the berm by 1 meter. Stabilize
riverside of the lagoon.
Lead and Partners Village council with NB Department of Environment
and Local Government
Resources Required Funding (possibly Provincial/Federal infrastructure
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funding available)
Timeline By 2021
Indicators of Success No breaches, a clean river
Activity: Relocate the lagoon
Description Examine alternate locations for the lagoon at higher
elevations. The Village owns land above the lagoon.
Perhaps only part of it would need to be moved
there.
Lead and Partners Village Council with NB Departments of Environment
and Health
Resources Required Funding (perhaps Federal funds available)
Timeline Research completed by 2021, implementation
(move) by 2026
Indicators of Success No breaches, a clean river
Activity: Green infrastructure to help stabilize ground by sewage lagoon
Description Plant trees, grasses, etc. by path along riverside of
lagoon.
Lead and Partners Village council with Ducks Unlimited and Community
Forests International
Resources Required Funding or perhaps in-kind support from DUC and
CFI
Timeline By 2021
Indicators of Success A more stable shoreline (currently trees along the
bank are falling into the river)
Activity: Engineering analysis of lagoon
Description A professional analysis of the lagoon is
recommended to identify further options, solutions
and costs.
Lead and Partners Village to seek and hire an engineer
Resources Required Funding
Timeline 2017
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Indicators of Success A report with monetary estimates
Downtown Area
Goal: Adapt to flood risk in the downtown business area, reduce risks and
potential damage to property.
Activity: Wet proofing buildings
Description Wet proof buildings located in the downtown
business area within the flood zone by: (1) having a
plan to sandbag buildings before storms (including
having sandbags stockpiled in the Village), (2)
encourage the installation of backflow valves, and (3)
sump pumps.
Lead and Partners Port Elgin EMO, EOS Eco-Energy and property
owners
Resources Required Funding
Timeline 2016-ongoing
Indicators of Success Number of buildings protected with sump pumps,
backflow valves and sandbags
Activity: Awareness program for downtown business area
Description Education is needed on how to prevent flood related
damages. Information to be shared about the new
flood risk maps, benefits of sump pumps and
backflow valves, as well as having a 72 Hour
emergency kit.
Lead and Partners EOS Eco-Energy and the Village
Resources Required Funding for EOS staff time
Timeline Ongoing
Indicators of Success A more aware business community taking steps to
protect their properties
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Fire Station
Goal: A suitable location for the fire department that allows connectivity to the
rest of the community and first response during flood events and other
emergencies.
Activity: Determine elevation of chosen site for Fire Station
Description The current potential site for the new fire station is
within the flood risk area. The elevation is needed to
determine design options.
Lead and Partners Village and Southeast Regional Service Commission
Resources Required Staff time at SERC
Timeline Early 2016
Indicators of Success Elevation determined
Activity: If need be, identify alternative locations for the Fire Station
Description It is crucial that the fire station (as first responders)
be situated in a location that allows connectivity to
the rest of the community during emergencies,
especially floods. Alternative locations need higher
elevations.
Lead and Partners Village, Fire Department and Port Elgin EMO
Resources Required Council and staff and volunteer time
Timeline By late 2016
Indicators of Success A new location for the fire station
Erosion along Gaspereau River’s edge
Goal: Stop erosion along the riverbanks.
Activity: Installation of crib work along Gaspereau River
Description Crib work has eroded in many places along the
river’s edge and need to be replaced. Riprap and
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boulder rock are also needed in places to stabilize
the river banks.
Lead and Partners Village with Federal/Provincial funding partners and
property owners
Resources Required Funding
Timeline 2017 and ongoing
Indicators of Success Stable riverbank
Activity: Investigate funding sources for erosion work
Description Funding sources need to be found to support the
erosion work including cribwork and engineering
analysis, etc.
Lead and Partners Village
Resources Required Funding
Timeline Ongoing
Indicators of Success Amount of financial resources found/secured.
Activity: Engineering analysis of erosion
Description A professional analysis of the erosion problem is
needed, including rate of erosion and best mitigation
options.
Lead and Partners Village to seek and hire an engineer
Resources Required Funding
Timeline 2017
Indicators of Success A report with monetary estimates
Activity: Fix erosion by Main St. lift station
Description This area is a priority for crib work as previous crib
work is gone and erosion is further affecting the
ground by the lift station. Work will need to be done
to cost the crib work and backfill needed.
Lead and Partners Village
Resources Required Funding
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Timeline By 2019
Indicators of Success Stabilized land by the lift station, no more erosion
Activity: Living shorelines
Description Where there is space, plant natural grasses to
prevent erosion and stabilize the riverbanks.
Lead and Partners Village with Community Forests International and
Ducks Unlimited Canada
Resources Required Funding
Timeline Ongoing
Indicators of Success Decreased erosion
Magee House
Goal: Magee House, owned by the NB government, is home to seniors and is
located within the flood risk area. The goal is to ensure the safety of the
residents, who have mobility challenges.
Activity: Inform New Brunswick Government about climate risks
Description Awareness is needed about the vulnerable location
of Magee House and the risk storm surge impacts
Lead and Partners EOS Eco-Energy in partnership with the Village
Resources Required Meeting time
Timeline 2016
Indicators of Success The province is aware and has a plan to deal with
the flood risk and safety of Magee House residents
Station Street Area
Goal: Station Street is the most vulnerable street in Port Elgin to impacts of
flooding. The goal is to increase public safety and protection of property.
Activity: Zoning regulations for Station Street
Description New zoning regulations need to be implemented that
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prevent new buildings from being constructed in the
Station Street flood risk area without some
adaptation considerations.
Lead and Partners Village and Southeast Regional Service Commission
(SERSC)
Resources Required Time by Village council and SERSC staff
Timeline 2016-2017
Indicators of Success New zoning regulations approved/adopted by Village
Council
Activity: Relocation of buildings from Station Street
Description Over the long-term buildings and homes in this area
may need to be relocated to less vulnerable sites.
Lead and Partners Village with Federal and/or Provincial funding
partners
Resources Required Funding
Timeline Long-term
Indicators of Success Buildings moved to safer locations.
Winter Storms
Goal: Storms, including those in the winter, will be increasing in intensity and
frequency. The goal is to ensure public safety during winter storms.
Activity: Wood heat inventory
Description An inventory of homes heated with wood is being
developed so that the EMO knows who has heat in
the community during power outages due to winter
storms.
Lead and Partners Port Elgin EMO
Resources Required EMO volunteer time
Timeline Ongoing
Indicators of Success A complete inventory that is updated regularly.
People opening their homes to others to stay warm.
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Activity: Emergency preparedness for winter storms
Description Port Elgin’s emergency plans needs to be updated
to include specific measures for winter storms,
including power outages and stranded residents due
to road closures from extreme snowfall.
Lead and Partners Port Elgin EMO
Resources Required EMO Volunteer time
Timeline 2016
Indicators of Success Complete emergency preparedness plan for winter
storms
Freshwater Flooding
Goal: To limit damage to property and roads from freshwater flooding
Activity: Culvert assessment
Description A professional engineer is required to assess the size
and condition of culverts in Port Elgin for adequate
flow.
Lead and Partners Village and engineer
Resources Required Funding
Timeline 2018
Indicators of Success Report outlining assessment of all culverts within
village boundary
Activity: Build and restore wetlands within village limits
Description Wetlands can limit freshwater flooding. More
wetlands are recommended in Port Elgin to help
manage storm water run off.
Lead and Partners Village in partnership with Ducks Unlimited Canada
Resources Required Funding
Timeline 2018-ongoing
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Indicators of Success Wetlands on the ground working to limit freshwater
water flooding.
Public Education
Goal: Better prepared community when floods or other emergencies strike.
Increased self-reliance during emergencies. Decreased reliance on the Village
and its resources during flood and winter storm emergencies. Better protected
properties and safer, more resilient community.
Activity: Bulk Purchase of Red Cross 72 Hour Emergency Kits
Description Conduct a bulk purchase of Red Cross 72 Hour
Emergency Kits in order to educate the public about
the importance of being prepared and to help reduce
the cost of the kits.
Lead and Partners EOS Eco-Energy
Resources Required EOS received funding from the NB Environmental
Trust Fund to offer this project.
Timeline The first bulk purchase was completed in September
2015.
Indicators of Success 115 Red Cross 72 Hour Emergency Kits were
purchased though EOS’s bulk program.
Activity: Sump Pump and Backflow Valve Bulk Purchases
Description A bulk purchase and installation of sump pumps and
backflow valves would help to educate the public
about the importance of these devises for flood
protection and to help reduce the cost.
Lead and Partners EOS Eco-Energy
Resources Required EOS has received funding from the NB
Environmental Trust Fund to conduct a bulk
purchase.
Timeline The bulk purchase of backflow valves will be offered
winter 2016. A sump pump bulk purchase will be
offered in the future.
Indicators of Success Installation of sump pumps and backflow valves.
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Activity: Continuous Public Education
Description As a way of mainstreaming adaptation into everyday
decision-making ongoing education and awarenessraising
on climate change impacts and adaptation is
required. Tips in the local paper, information booths,
mail-outs, news articles, workshops, etc are all
useful to keep climate change top of mind in Port
Elgin.
Lead and Partners Village of Port Elgin and EOS Eco-Energy
Resources Required Funding and staff time
Timeline Ongoing
Indicators of Success A more resilient, safe and adaptable community
Summary of Recommended Actions
Timeline Actions
Ongoing • Wet proofing in the downtown area (sump pumps,
backflow valves, sandbags, etc.)
• Awareness and education program on climate change
adaptation and emergency preparedness (workshops;
bulk purchases of emergency kits, sump pumps; etc.)
• Investigate funding sources for erosion work along the
Gaspereau River
• Where there is space, plant natural grasses to limit
erosion along Gaspereau River
• Wood heat inventory (for winter storms)
Short (2016-
2017)
• Engineering analysis of lagoon
• Determine elevation of selected location for fire station
• If need be, determine alternate locations for fire station
• Installation of cribwork along Gaspereau River (start in
2017 and continuing)
• Engineering analysis of erosion
• Inform New Brunswick government about climate related
risks for Magee House
• Update zoning regulations for Main Street to include
adaptation considerations
• Update EMO plan to include specific measures for winter
storms
Community Climate Change Adaptation Plan 2016 EOS Eco-Energy Inc.
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Medium (2018-
2021)
• Build up the berm around the sewage lagoon
• Complete research to move the sewage lagoon
• Plant trees, grasses, etc. along path by riverside of
lagoon
• Fix erosion by Main St. lift station
• Culvert assessment by professional engineer
• Build and restore wetlands within the village (start in 2018
and continuing)
Long (beyond
2021)
• Sewage lagoon moved to a safer location with higher
elevation
• Relocation of buildings from Station Street to less
vulnerable location
Implementation and Monitoring
The Village of Port Elgin council and staff will be responsible for implementing
the adaptation plan and meeting their goals according to the timelines in the
plan. Progress will be monitored regularly and communicated to the public
through a variety of means, such as the local paper, community meetings, and
social media. Progress will be ensured due to the creation of a climate change
adaptation implementation committee. The committee will meet once a year to
monitor progress, take steps to ensure implementation of the plan continues,
and report to Port Elgin Village Council. Members of the committee will include:
• Village representative
• EMO coordinator
• SERSC representative
• EOS Eco-Energy representative
• Community member
Community Climate Change Adaptation Plan 2016 EOS Eco-Energy Inc.
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Glossary
Abandonment refers to leaving an area that has become too vulnerable to flood
and/or erosion risks.
Adaptation describes how we adjust to future climate conditions. Adaptation
involves making adjustments in our decisions, activities, and thinking, because
of projected changes in climate. Making these adjustments will help decrease
the negative effects of the changing climate, and allow us to take advantage of
any new and favourable opportunities.
Climate change adaptation plan is a community plan that examines local
climate change impacts, flood risk scenarios, risks and vulnerabilities to climaterelated
impacts, and outlines an action plan with adaptation options including
lead, partners, resources needed, timelines and goals.
Constructed wetlands are manmade wetlands or restored wetlands.
Development agreements are contracts between two parties establishing an
agreement concerning development of a parcel of land.
Emergency preparedness is the creation of plans through which communities
reduce vulnerability to hazards and cope with disasters.
Dry flood proofing buildings involves making the structure watertight by
sealing the walls with waterproof coatings, impermeable membranes, or a
supplemental layer of masonry or concrete
Dyke is a long wall or embankment built to prevent flooding from the sea.
Flood scenarios are based on projected sea levels and storm events that may
impact a given area. They are generally outlined in “likelihood” of the event
occurring. For example, a 1 in 10 year storm event is likely to happen once
every 10 years, or each year there is a 10% chance of it happening.
Green/living shorelines use vegetation and natural materials to reduce
negative impacts on nearshore habitat for plants, fish, and wildlife while
protecting property.
Integrated community sustainability plan is a long-term plan, developed in
consultation with community members, to help the community realize
sustainability objectives within environmental, cultural, social and economic
dimensions.
Land use bylaws regulate and control the use and development of all land and
buildings within the municipal boundaries.
Maladaptation is a course of action that is more harmful than helpful as it
results in more problems it was intended to prevent.
Community Climate Change Adaptation Plan 2016 EOS Eco-Energy Inc.
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Managed retreat allows an area that was not previously exposed to flooding by
the sea to become flooded by removing coastal protection.
Rain gardens are planted with native plants and grasses and allow runoff to be
absorbed into the ground slowly and naturally; they limit flooding and are a
natural storm water management option.
Raised infrastructure refers to increasing the height the buildings and other
infrastructure to decrease impacts from flooding.
Setbacks are rules to ensure buildings are set back from roads, rivers,
wetlands, coastal areas, etc. for safety and environmental reasons.
Statutory community plan in New Brunswick is a Municipal or Rural Plan
developed under the Community Planning Act.
Storm water management involves techniques used to reduce pollutants from,
detain, retain, or provide a discharge point for storm water to best preserve or
mimic the natural hydrologic cycle, to accomplish goals of reducing combined
sewer overflows or basement sewer backups, or to fit within the capacity of
existing infrastructure.
Wet flood proofing buildings involves making a series of modifications to a
structure to allow an enclosed area to flood. Allowing the building to flood
reduces the risk of damage to the structure. It can also involve placing electrical
utilities above the flood level as well as appliances, important documents, etc.
so that what remains can withstand a flood.
Community Climate Change Adaptation Plan 2016 EOS Eco-Energy Inc.
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Appendix – Public Engagement Materials
Community Climate Change Adaptation Plan 2016 EOS Eco-Energy Inc.
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Community Climate Change Adaptation Plan 2016 EOS Eco-Energy Inc.
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WorkSafe NB

WorkSafeNB has undertaken an initiative to reduce the frequency and severity of injuries to workers in the waste collection industry. We want to work with you to help ensure every worker returns home safely after each shift.

 

We know that homeowner habits can impact the health and safety of waste collection workers, and this was reinforced during our discussions with industry stakeholder. As part of this initiative, we will be launching a spring campaign to engage homeowners. We will remind New Brunswickers that they are part of the solution – they can help protect waste collection workers.

 

Through this public awareness campaign involving radio, digital advertising and social media, we’ll offer tips to help homeowners safely prepare garbage, such as ensuring bags are within recommended weight limits and how to dispose of sharp objects or hazardous waste. We’ll also remind New Brunswickers to be careful when driving around waste collection workers. Their workplace includes our driveways and streets.

 

To learn more about how we can work together to improve workplace safety in this industry, contact our communications team at WorkSafeNB at 506 632-2223 or toll-free at 1 800 222-9775, or by email at communications@ws-ts.nb.ca.

With your help, we can achieve our vision of healthy and safe workplaces in New Brunswick.

 

EMO Port Elgin

 

EMO Port Elgin is creating a list of people with wood burning stoves that would be willing to assist others by inviting them into their homes during power outages.

If you would like to be added to this list please call Terry Murphy at 538-7537 or Angela Grant at the Village Office at 538-2120.

NB SPCA

The NB SPCA has been contracted to provide dog control services in Port Elgin. In addition to their role in investigating neglect and abuse, the NB SPCA will now respond to complaints of dogs running at large, barking dogs, etc. To access this service please call the 24/7 bilingual line at 1-877-722-1522.

A friendly reminder for all dog owners

With the nice weather upon us, residents and visitors will enjoy a walk through our village considerably more if we remember all dogs must be on substantial leash or quality restraining chain or rope when outside of house, or properly built pen, and while being walked.

Register your pet

Also, if you have not already visited the Village Office to register your pet for 2016, please do so.